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alittlebitgayandmore:

Shang’s journey to self discovery as told by me


Reblogged from shimish (Originally from alittlebitgayandmore)
Source: alittlebitgayandmore

Reblogged from simplypi

Reblogged from clarifyingobfuscation (Originally from sukoshi-soo)
Source: sukoshi-soo

Reblogged from dvsjustin (Originally from robertdeniro)
Source: robertdeniro
geographilic:

A natural arch in Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona

geographilic:

A natural arch in Lower Antelope Canyon, Arizona


Reblogged from matcol (Originally from geographilic)
Source: geographilic

Reblogged from everythingsuchas (Originally from urbnite)
Source: urbnite

Reblogged from simplypi
thisoldapt:

You’re 5 items and a couple of hours away from a real-life hairpin-leg coffee table. Here’s the Step-by-Step. -ts
Show us YOUR coffee table (whether you built it or not) here.

thisoldapt:

You’re 5 items and a couple of hours away from a real-life hairpin-leg coffee table. Here’s the Step-by-Step. -ts

Show us YOUR coffee table (whether you built it or not) here.


Reblogged from thisoldapt
thisoldapt:

Here’s a random nerdy project to kill any weekend boredom: Everything You Need to Punch Tin via thisoldhouse:

During the colonial era, punched tin made its mark on everything from lanterns to cupboards. Today, these intricate designs on metal can lend furniture and built-ins a unique, handcrafted look—and, thankfully, you don’t need to apprentice yourself to a master to make them. Though he uses specialty tools and metals he weathers by hand, second-generation tinsmith Richard Lavy of Katie’s Colonial Lighting insists that any novice can tackle the process with little more than a sketched pattern on paper, a sheet of tin or copper, and a hammer and chisel or nailset. Inspired to personalize your cabinets with some punched tin? Read on for other off-the-shelf items Lavy suggests for creating panels at home. More

thisoldapt:

Here’s a random nerdy project to kill any weekend boredom: Everything You Need to Punch Tin via thisoldhouse:

During the colonial era, punched tin made its mark on everything from lanterns to cupboards. Today, these intricate designs on metal can lend furniture and built-ins a unique, handcrafted look—and, thankfully, you don’t need to apprentice yourself to a master to make them. Though he uses specialty tools and metals he weathers by hand, second-generation tinsmith Richard Lavy of Katie’s Colonial Lighting insists that any novice can tackle the process with little more than a sketched pattern on paper, a sheet of tin or copper, and a hammer and chisel or nailset. Inspired to personalize your cabinets with some punched tin? Read on for other off-the-shelf items Lavy suggests for creating panels at home. More


Reblogged from thisoldapt

Reblogged from interiordesignmagazine
retrogasm:

Stunning!

retrogasm:

Stunning!


Reblogged from matcol (Originally from retrogasm)
Source: retrogasm

cjwho:

The Hälssen & Lyon Tea Calendar by Kolle Rebbe, Hamburg

The Hälssen & Lyon tea calendar is the first calendar in the world to feature calendar days made from tea leaves. Finely flavoured and pressed until wafer-thin, the 365 calendar days can be individually detached and brewed directly in the cup with hot water. The tea calendar was sent exclusively to selected business partners.

CJWHO:  facebook  |  instagram | twitter  |  pinterest  |  subscribe


Reblogged from everythingsuchas (Originally from cjwho)
Source: cjwho

Reblogged from ummhello
bklyn-finest:

Can i get an amen?

bklyn-finest:

Can i get an amen?


Reblogged from verdeinvolumes (Originally from ohyeselifresh)
Source: ohyeselifresh

nevver:

Drinking is bad, feelings are worse - Nick Barclay


Reblogged from everythingsuchas (Originally from nevver)
Source: nickbarclaydesigns.com